Of Mice And Men Essay On American Dream

Of Mice And Men Essay On American Dream-57
Of Mice and Men teaches a grim lesson about the nature of human existence.Nearly all of the characters, including George, Lennie, Candy, Crooks, and Curley’s wife, admit, at one time or another, to having a profound sense of loneliness and isolation.After hearing a description of only a few sentences, Candy is completely drawn in by its magic.

Of Mice and Men teaches a grim lesson about the nature of human existence.Nearly all of the characters, including George, Lennie, Candy, Crooks, and Curley’s wife, admit, at one time or another, to having a profound sense of loneliness and isolation.

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Most of the characters in Of Mice and Men admit, at one point or another, to dreaming of a different life.

Before her death, Curley’s wife confesses her desire to be a movie star.

Ever’body wants a little piece of lan’.” George and Lennie’s dream is of a place where “nobody gonna hurt nobody nor steal from ’em.” These paradises—real and imaginary—are contrasted with the ranch, which is owned by Curley’s father and is a place of fear and isolation, a place where the workers get hurt and robbed.

This contrast indicates that land-ownership is like Satan’s treachery in the biblical story: it is the act which destroys innocence and paradise.

Having just admitted his own vulnerabilities—he is a black man with a crooked back who longs for companionship—Crooks zeroes in on Lennie’s own weaknesses.

In scenes such as this one, Steinbeck records a profound human truth: oppression does not come only from the hands of the strong or the powerful.Lennie and George, who come closest to achieving this ideal of brotherhood, are forced to separate tragically.With this, a rare friendship vanishes, but the rest of the world—represented by Curley and Carlson, who watch George stumble away with grief from his friend’s dead body—fails to acknowledge or appreciate it.Drawing on the biblical story of the Fall in which Adam and Eve sin in the Garden of Eden, Of Mice and Men argues that the social and economic world in which its characters live is fundamentally flawed.The novella opens by an Eden-like pool that is presented as a natural paradise.Crooks, bitter as he is, allows himself the pleasant fantasy of hoeing a patch of garden on Lennie’s farm one day, and Candy latches on desperately to George’s vision of owning a couple of acres.Before the action of the story begins, circumstances have robbed most of the characters of these wishes.It could be argued that all the characters in the novel share this dream.The American Dream was a dream that nearly everyone had throughout the twentieth century.Each desires the comfort of a friend, but will settle for the attentive ear of a stranger.Curley’s wife admits to Candy, Crooks, and Lennie that she is unhappily married, and Crooks tells Lennie that life is no good without a companion to turn to in times of confusion and need.

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