Using Quotes In Essays

Using Quotes In Essays-20
However, just skipping it would not work -- the final sentence would not make sense without it. In order to do so, you will need to use some editing symbols.Your quotation might end up looking like this: In his essay, “United Shareholders of America,” Jacob Weisberg insists that “The citizen-investor serves his fellow citizens badly by his inclination to withdraw from the community. by focusing his pursuit of happiness on something that very seldom makes people happy in the way they expect it to.” The brackets around the word [money] indicate that you have substituted that word for other words the author used.In this case, however, the paragraph following the one quoted explains that the author is referring to money, so it is okay.

However, just skipping it would not work -- the final sentence would not make sense without it. In order to do so, you will need to use some editing symbols.Your quotation might end up looking like this: In his essay, “United Shareholders of America,” Jacob Weisberg insists that “The citizen-investor serves his fellow citizens badly by his inclination to withdraw from the community. by focusing his pursuit of happiness on something that very seldom makes people happy in the way they expect it to.” The brackets around the word [money] indicate that you have substituted that word for other words the author used.In this case, however, the paragraph following the one quoted explains that the author is referring to money, so it is okay.

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When you have "embedded quotes," or quotations within quotations, you should switch from the normal quotation marks ("") to single quotation marks ('') to show the difference.

For example, if an original passage by John Archer reads: Akutagawa complicates the picture of picture of himself as mere “reader on the verge of writing his own text,” by having his narrated persona actually finish authoring the work in wich he appears.

Although it stood with its head raised, even its yellowed wings had been eaten by insects.

He thought of his entire life and felt tears and cruel laughter welling up inside. With this gesture Akutagawa ironizes the impossibility of truly writing the self by emphasizing the inevitable split that must occur between writing and written “self,” the Akutagawa still writing “A Fool's Life” cannot possibly be identical with the narrated persona which has finished the work.

To make a substitution this important, however, you had better be sure that [money] is what the final phrase meant -- if the author intentionally left it ambiguous, you would be significantly altering his meaning.

That would make you guilty of fraudulent attribution.

Many teachers I have worked with don’t like when students use quotes in essays.

In fact, some teachers absolutely hate essay quotes.

Too much depends on the facts of the case, the aggressiveness of the copyright owner, and the perspective of the judge. Finally, using copyright-protected quotes on merchandise, such as t-shirts or coffee mugs, is not fair use. For similar reasons, I recommend against using a copyright-protected quote on a book cover.

By the way, hymns and prayers may be protected by copyright just like any other writing. Writers can and should take risks, even legal risks. Take risks that improve your work or your reach and avoid those that are careless or worthless.

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